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Grade 4

Community Christmas Celebrations: Traditions of the World Arrive with the Settlers

Grade 2 students will learn about the Christmas traditions brought to our community by early settlers from many countries.  This will allow students to gather information on past traditions and celebrations of Christmas for classroom discussion of continuity and change in the various holiday traditions of their families today.

The Settlers: A New Life in Canada (Kit)

This multi-media educational resource kit contains photographs, pictures, artefacts, a video and books, in addition to background information, covering the topics of early settler life, homes, farms, transportation, clothing, food, communication and village life.

The kit contains word search puzzles and other activities to capture your students' interest, as well as "how-to" sheets for such hands-on lessons as candle dipping and butter-making.

Apples

Students visit the log cabin, where they learn about the many uses settlers had for their apple harvest. A dried apple wreath will be made by the class to take back to school to be proudly displayed in the classroom.

In the Victorian cottage, students will have the opportunity to use a reproduction late-1800's apple peeler and play the apple peel game. The freshly peeled apples are then used to make apple crisp to bake in the wood stove. A sample of the results is always a highlight.

Back to School, Back in Time

Role-playing pioneer students in an authentic one-room schoolhouse will transport your students back in time. Students will learn about schoolroom set up, subjects studied, discipline and school equipment, all within the walls of a real one-room schoolhouse.

As they practice their penmanship with pen and ink, attempt an early drawing lesson, and copy their arithmetic questions from blackboard to slate, students learn first-hand the challenges and enjoyments of one-room schoolhouses.

 

Busy at Home

The work of pioneer life becomes real for students as they fetch water in wooden buckets, wash clothes on a scrub board and dip a candle by hand from wax melted over an open fire.  Spending time in the log cabin allows students to see first-hand many of the objects they are learning about in studying settler life.

Exploring Early Careers

Engage your students in a day of exploring the lives and careers of the settlers. The teachers and parent volunteers will take their groups of students to visit the various homes and village buildings to meet the settlers at work. Some of the careers you may explore will be:

  • blacksmith
  • harness-maker
  • spinner
  • clockmaker
  • minister
  • farmer
  • homemaker
  • teacher

Settler "Sampler"

A guided tour of our heritage village gives your students the opportunity to learn about the life and work of the settlers.  Visit the homes, blacksmith shop, railroad station, historic church, carpentry shop and fire hall.  To maximize student interest and learning, choose the hands-on activities that best suit your class and its focus of study. 

Activity options

Choose one from each grouping:

Choose one of:

Life in a One-Room School

If your bus money is limited, this is the program for you.  A Museum staff person will visit your classroom (Lambton County and north Chatham/Kent only) and introduce your students to school life in the early days of rural Ontario.

"Life in a One-Room School" looks at student life in early one-room schools.  Hands-on activities are an important part of this program and include writing with a quill pen, doing a lesson on a slate and (for grades 3 and up) an attempt at an early drawing lesson.

Childhood Memories

Make a pioneer toy to take home...
Play Victorian parlour games...
Try on a pioneer costume...
Roll a hoop, write on a slate...

This is an activity-based program your students will long remember.  Visits are made to the log cabin and Victorian cottage where students learn about children's lives during each time period, including playing some games of the day.  Students attend the one-room school to learn proper 19th century behaviour and to try a lesson on a slate.

Resourceful Pioneers

Nothing was wasted in the pioneer home.  Pioneers reduced, re-used and recycled out of necessity.  Every part of an animal or plant was put to use.  Nature supplied dyes for fabric and medicines for the family.  Clothing was handed down to younger children, and then recycled into quilts or rugs when it could no longer be mended. 

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